A Do-It-Yourself Book Scanner

I found an instructable for a DIY book scanner. There seems to be a thriving online community based around building DIY book scanners as well. I have a lot of books I’d like to scan into electronic format. There’s a startup called One Dollar Scan that will scan your books for a dollar. Unfortunately it’s based in the US. It would cost me a fortune to send my books over there to be scanned. A DIY book scanner sounds like the ideal solution for me.

My iRex iLiad

So I ended up getting iRex Technologies iLiad e-book reader. I have been using it for about a month now, and I absolutely love it! I usually switch it on so I can read it on the way to Canary Wharf (currently doing a contract out there), and leave it on the whole day. It’s like having an iPod – but for books. I’ve installed an 8GB SD card, and I’ve got lots of books and maths and computing papers loaded.

Mobile Reading

I’ve been interested in electronic book readers with e-Ink technology ever since I read about the Sony Reader. I waited and waited for them to bring the reader out in the UK, but it’s been over a year and still no release.

A friend sent me a link the other day about the Iliad. This seems like a fantastic device, but it’s quite expensive!

I then discovered a review on e-book readers on Wired magazine. This led me to discover Bookeen’s CyBook Gen3. The CyBook is lighter and cheaper than the Iliad and the battery lasts a lot longer. According to two reviews I read; the screen quality isn’t quite as good on the CyBook as compared to the Iliad, and both reviews mentioned that the button for turning the pages was awkwardly placed. There seems to be a very active developer community for the Iliad which is a big plus.

The price, weight and power consumption difference between the Iliad and the CyBook are probably because the Iliad has a Wacom digitizer in it, so you can draw and take notes on the screen. Also the Iliad screen is bigger and supports 16 shades of gray as opposed to 4.